Main Ways of Transportation to Get to Brazil

Riverboat, Manaus, ©nicksarebi/Flickr

Riverboat, Manaus, ©nicksarebi/Flickr

Tourists traveling to Brazil can choose from more types of transportation to reach any part of the country. Most of tourists prefer to travel by plane, because it’s fast and comfortable, but there is also a large number of travelers who feel more safe if they are using ways of transportation that have wheels. If you love the wavering sea you can also take a boat to get to Brazil. Whether you are traveling by plane, boat or on the land by bus or car, you will definitely experience an unforgettable journey, you only have to enjoy the beautiful landscapes unfolding in front of your eyes. Below we provide some information on the three main ways to enter Brazil: by air, by river, and by road.

High Above the Sky

Traveling by airplane is a fast and comfortable way to get to Brazil. For most visitors the point of arrival will be Cumbica International Airport at Guarulhos in São Paulo or Tom Jobim International Airport (also known as Galeão) on the Ilha do Governador, 16 km from the centre of Rio de Janeiro. Details of other entry airports are given in their respective sections. Make sure you arrive two hours before international flights and it is wise to reconfirm your flight in advance as departure times may have changed.

Tom Jobim International Airport (Galeão), ©victorcamilo/Flickr

Tom Jobim International Airport (Galeão), ©victorcamilo/Flickr

Enjoy the Waving Sea

Boats run from Iquitos in Peru to Tabatinga in Brazil. Onward travel is then on a five-day riverboat journey (or when they are available, a flight) to Manaus, the capital of the Amazon. This border can also be crossed by land from Leticia in Colombia, which is alongside Tabatinga. Getting through these borders can be difficult as security is tight and Brazilian immigration occasionally refuse to allow entry to Brazil for more than 30 days. Using a boat to get to Brazil can be a peaceful journey, in the meantime tourists can enjoy the beautiful landscape of the sea.

Riverboat, Manaus, ©nicksarebi/Flickr

Riverboat, Manaus, ©nicksarebi/Flickr

Stay on Four Wheels

For those who feel more safe on the land there is the opportunity to take a bus, or travel by car. Getting to Brazil by bus is easier than you think. Argentina is connected to the south of Brazil at Foz de Iguaçu/ Puerto Iguazú in Paraná state, Porto Xavier/San Javier on the Uruguay river and Uruguaiana/Paso de los Libres, both in Rio Grande do Sul state. Bolivia is connected to Brazil at Puerto Quijarro/Corumbá via road and rail, with onward connections to the rest of Bolivia via Santa Cruz. French Guiana is connected from Cayenne via Oyapock/Oiapoque to Macapá. The road is unpaved in Brazil.

Brazil by car, ©André Gustavo Stumpf/Flickr

Brazil by car, ©André Gustavo Stumpf/Flickr

Getting around South America by car is a good way to travel. There are agreements between Brazil and most South American countries (check in the case of Bolivia) whereby a car can be taken into Brazil for a period of 90 days without any special documents. For cars registered in other countries, you need proof of ownership and/or registration in the home country and valid driving licence. A 90-day permit is given by customs or at the Serviço de Controle Aduaneiro, and the procedure is straightforward. Keep all the papers you are given when you enter, to produce when you leave.

 

 

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